Tag Archives: sustainable

Sustainable prawns, at a price

Spencer_Gulf_king_prawns_MSC_certified

I’m a prawn junkie. I love those little schoolies salt and spice rubbed and deep-fried to crispy perfection. Or king prawns skewered lengthwise, barbecued in their full body armour, and peeled to reveal plump, pink, almost steamed, flesh. Banana prawns dressed in Panko breadcrumbs, deep-fried and dipped in a chilli-kicked mango mayonnaise make me weak at the knees. I save prawn shells to make stock for tom yam goong (sour & spicy prawn soup) – my favourite Thai dish. But a generous handful of prawns cooked in a thick, rich, Indian butter curry is by far my guiltiest pleasure. Ah, yes, I love a good prawn.

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Filed under Food Issues, Sustainable Seafood Challenge

Alpaca: from fluff ball to boutique meat

 

Millpaca _alpaca

Millpaca alpaca (courtesy Millpaca Farm)

 

Alpaca are best known for their cute looks and gossamer fine fleece, not their eco-friendly soft hooves and virtually fat-free flesh. But these latter traits have carved out a new market for the South American import: boutique meat. Continue reading

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Filed under Produce

Little fish

sardines

Sydney Fish Market sardines

I’m teaching myself to cook little, less popular fish. Sardines, leatherjacket, mackerel and barbounia have all debuted on my kitchen bench in recent months. In fact, let’s take a step back. I’m teaching myself to cook fish. It’s never been a strength of mine. I’ve barbecued snapper wrapped in banana leaf and baked a whole salmon, but they were one-offs and their success – I suspect – was a fluke. I’m a dab hand at fish cakes. And I’ve got beer battering and deep-frying down pat, but hand me a fish slice and a fillet of barramundi, john dory, or salmon and I’m  a little bit lost. I’ll probably cook it until that oily white stuff oozes out – a sign of over-cooking, so i’m told. I’ll pan fry it carefully then blast it in the microwave just to be safe.

So I’m teaching myself to cook fish – little ones in particular. Continue reading

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Filed under Sustainable Seafood Challenge